About LensLord™

I am a photographer for hire. You can find out more about me at this link http://lenslord.com/about/

One Day Road Trip – Beach Cities from Encinitas to Mulholland Drive.

I am starting to offer “One Day Road Trip workshops.” The intent is to teach a very small single-car group of people how to use their cameras to capture their imagination in various situations. I do that by showing you how to decide what we want to shoot, and how to use their cameras to capture the needed images for a wide range of photographic targets, from a single image, to multiple image HDR panoramas.

This workshop worked the San Diego to L.A. route from the south, north. The next time, we will work from the north to the south, ending with a sunset somewhere along the coast.

The day went something like this, Drive and talk about options for the next target, and plan those shots while driving. Pull over at the target, and shoot the images we discussed, plus a few non planed shots. Then drive again, discussing the post production that those captured images will go through, and plan the next stop. … We did that all day long.

For example, this day, the first stop was in Encinitas, where we visited the art gallery of Kirk Saber. This is an Image of Kirk and Renee in the gallery. It is a multi image stitched panorama. You can click on the image to see a larger version.

We stopped, and started, all along the way. … Here we did some light painting in Venice. This is a combination of 10 long exposure images.

The gallery of my Workshop images created during this trip.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

We were writing a “Road Trip” book.


Copyright-JackFosterMancilla


And the 5D

by Jack Foster Mancilla
The small LensLord™ gallery on Flickr
The Full LensLord™ Gallery

The bottom line. … It is much easier than you think. … First, you start, then, you string a bunch of words together that make sense. … Oh, it helps if you have a bunch of cool pictures to go with the words.

My friend says this about herself. … “I have an extensive background in the financial planning industry and am a novice in the event planning industry.
I am equally comfortable with both the corporate world as well as working in a creative environment.

Me? I just say that she is a friend. … A good friend who wants to work with me. … Who could ask for more?

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Cinemagraph Pro – A Little bit Magic.

GypsyBridge2

Gypsy at the Bridge

by Jack Foster Mancilla
The small LensLord™ gallery on Flickr
The Full LensLord™ Gallery

This is a little quickie animated gif, created with Cinemagraph Pro, available in the App store.

The truth is that it is very easy to use. This is just a small handheld iPhone gif, but it would be a hundred times better with a larger format camera, and a tripod. I just wanted to play with it a little. …

What it does is converts any movie by freezing a chosen frame, and allowing specifically masked portions of the frame to reveal movement in the following frames. It is very easy to just brush in, or out, any portion of the frame by adjusting the mask.

The final product can be exported as a movie, for inclusion in other projects or as stand alone movies. Or, the final product can be exported as an animated gif, with options, like looping, bounce back, numbers of repetitions. …

This particular animated gif is a small part of a larger movie, that I chose the in point, the end point, and the time taken for the movement, I then added a bounce back, so the loop runs forward to the end then runs backwards, to the start, and then keeps that loop up forever….

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Zen at the Setting of the Sun

Everything that exists is its own complete universe. …
I stand by the sea, clicking away with my shutter release, grabbing the moments of a local sunset. Grabbing the fleeting moments as the sun hides behind the limb of the earth.
I stand with Gypsy, my dog who also enjoys the last few rays of this day. This day, when the sun, and the earth, and Gypsy, and I, all exists simultaneously.
This little moment, a few eye blinks between the Big Bang, and the final collapse of this universe, we share, almost entirely, the entirety of everything.

Everyone is the center of their own universe. … We are all equidistant from our centers, in all directions, at the speed of expansion, our individual observable universes, as they recede in an ever growing bubble of space time. Because we are all in different locations, and the speed of light is finite, all our observable universes are slightly out of sync.

Our universes overlap in every point except at the edges of the universe. Our edges are either, slightly closer or slightly farther away, from each of us, depending which edge we are closer to, by the distance that light takes to travle between us.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

The Gathering Tree

20140313-104721.jpg

The Gathering Tree

by Jack Foster Mancilla
The small LensLord™ gallery on Flickr
The Full LensLord™ Gallery

I love this place in the canyon. It had always appeared to me as a place to gather; gather friends, gather performers, or just gather any group of people in the shade of a tree, sitdown and have a beer, and a very good conversation.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Incredible view of the Hollywood Hills.

This is a multi-image panorama of the entirety of the Hollywood hills, Los Angeles Hills. In its full size, this image is 30 inches tall by approximately 140 inches wide. … It is a very large panorama.

It was a very clear day, and everything is crystal clear. … Please look at a larger version of the image.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

My Flickr images are suprising me.

As a photographer, I have several photo display accounts. In addition to my SmugMug Gallery, this blog, 500pix, I also have my Flickr account.

This posting is about my Flickr account. … In the grand scheme of things, I know my viewers numbers are not very high, but I find them interesting. I wonder how people found my Flickr postings in the first place. :-)

It seems that recently, my Flickr account is getting a much larger number of viewers. The viewers may go away, but for now, it is kind of cool to watch.

This image to the right covers some traffic information over the past month that I find interesting. I have highlighted three different days, with differing numbers of visitors. The highlighted day in the middle of the other two says “Zero” views. … I think that is an aberration, some sort of missed recording whatever. The first highlighted day is the day with the lowest number of views. It says that there have been 148 views. One hundred forty-eight, that’s kind of cool. One hundred forty-eight used to be a high view day, but in this last month, it is the day with the lowest number of viewers.

The general trend for the past six months has been one of a very slow growth, but always averaging an upward trend. … That last highlighted thing is for today. It says 2,390 views for today. … And today isn’t even over.
As a matter of fact, I just checked as I finished writing this post, and it now says 2,407. Cool! :-)

*** Adendum *** Todays total came in at 2,528 at the end of Flickrs 24 hour day.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

A thing about Panoramas

This is just a little piece of information about why I shoot multi image panoramas. …I could shoot this with a single image using a very wide angle lens, or I could use a longer lens and take multiple images, and then stitch them together.

The secret is in the detail. … I believe everyone who reads this is a great photographer, or is smart enough to know the little things I know already. …

Detail. … The source image is a stitched set of ten images, five images per horizontal row. I shoot with a Canon 5D Mark II, whose RAW image width is about 5,600 pixels. … This combined RAW image has a width of 20,000 pixels, and a height of about 9,000 pixels. … In little words, “This image is way big.” That is what the image call-out is showing at the bottom of the image. Detail. … A little detail of the center of the combined image. If I had used a single wide angle image, my source would be only 5,600 pixels wide, not near as much detail in 5,600 pixels as 20,000 pixels.

I like stitched multi-image panoramas because they can maintain the beauty of a great space, as seen from a distance, and simultaneously, you can get close and see all kinds of interesting stories in the same image. … ;-) Details.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Bienvenidos a Tijuana y México

Last week I went to Tijuana, Baja California, México, with the Pacific Photographic Society, a Meetup group that generates great photo trips, also having the benefit that it is also full of friends.It was the first time I had been south of the border in many years, only because I had no specific need, or an opportunity to visit with friends that also wanted to go. What a hoot! The organizer of the group is my friend, and a fellow photographer, Walter Koenig. Thanks Walter.

Now, onto the trip. Here in San Diego we are bombarded with so many negative stereotypes, and visions, of our neighbors just across the border that, when I mentioned to my nextdoor neighbor that I was heading south with a group, he said, “Don’t go.” We did not listen to the voices of preprogrammed fear. … We went, and we had a good time.

This is a link to my complete gallery of images from our Tijuana excursion.

Louie Navaro, of George’s Camera, was our guide for the trip. Louie also has a gallery he shares with two other photographers in Tijuana.

We walked across the border, and then met up with the van on the other side. First, we drove over to the Playas de Tijuana, where we shot some photos of the border, where it enters the ocean, and along the beach, and boardwalk. I met a young fighter, Ramon Barboza, El Moncho! … It was a very cool day at the beach.

Later, I got separated from the group after we had wandered around for a little while in the downtown area of Tijuana, and Ave. Revolución. … I asked a few folks which way to San Diego, on foot, and they pointed me in the right direction. It was a pleasant walk, but damn! When I got to the border, the pedestrian line was over two hours long. Holy Mackerel, what a nightmare!

Luckily for me, the rest of my group came wandering by while I was in line. They pulled me out, and we all took an eleven passenger van up to the border, where we used the bus line border transit, and that only took an hour and a few minutes!

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –