Perseid Meteors 20100812-EarlyAM

I did mention this was coming. This is a time lapse video created from 1100 still images that were taken on August 12th between sometime between 01:30 in the morning and 03:30 in the morning. If you really want to know the time, ask me and I can give you a specific time for each frame.

The exposures were five seconds long. I shot wide open as fast I could, trying to get the brightest image I could have, of the meteors, in relation to the stars. … The stars were exposed for five seconds, but the meteors ran through the frame very fast, not even close to a full second, so they had to be very bright to be seen.

If you look very carefully at individual frames, you will see many small meteors, but about 36 seconds into the video, you will see one humongous meteor. And, if you look really hard, you will see a cloud of glowing gas slowly expand for the next few seconds of the video. That expansion took place over three full minutes. Amazing!

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

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LensLord™

I am a photographer for hire. You can find out more about me at this link https://lenslord.com/about/

4 thoughts on “Perseid Meteors 20100812-EarlyAM”

  1. Hey Jack, Nice work. those must be the planes landing at the San Diego Airport? Just guessing since the tags you listed seem to be from the SD area. As with Will (comment above) I’m new to the whole time-lapse arena as well and am wondering what program you used to build the movie? Would you mind sharing?

    Thanks!

    Nathan

    1. Tags do say San Diego area, but the entire Star Field rotates around Polaris, which is left of center in the frame, so we are looking North. … The glow on the Horizon is, I think, lights from the Palm Springs area. … When I checked the map, we are looking North, across Earthquake Valley, then across Borrego and the Anza Borrego desert, and then on to the Palm Springs and Palm Desert area. … I guess that the planes are heading towards, and from the L.A. area. I used Aperture, Photoshop, QuickTime.

  2. Hey Jack, what kind of lens did you use? You say you shot these with the f-stop wide open? What kind ISO did you use? I’m a newbie at night photography, tried to shoot the meteor shower but only a few of mine came out.. thanks Will

    1. Just take your digital camera, and shoot a few test shots. The object is to see the meteors, which flash by in an instant, and the stars, that continually put out light. …

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