A thing about Panoramas

This is just a little piece of information about why I shoot multi image panoramas. …I could shoot this with a single image using a very wide angle lens, or I could use a longer lens and take multiple images, and then stitch them together.

The secret is in the detail. … I believe everyone who reads this is a great photographer, or is smart enough to know the little things I know already. …

Detail. … The source image is a stitched set of ten images, five images per horizontal row. I shoot with a Canon 5D Mark II, whose RAW image width is about 5,600 pixels. … This combined RAW image has a width of 20,000 pixels, and a height of about 9,000 pixels. … In little words, “This image is way big.” That is what the image call-out is showing at the bottom of the image. Detail. … A little detail of the center of the combined image. If I had used a single wide angle image, my source would be only 5,600 pixels wide, not near as much detail in 5,600 pixels as 20,000 pixels.

I like stitched multi-image panoramas because they can maintain the beauty of a great space, as seen from a distance, and simultaneously, you can get close and see all kinds of interesting stories in the same image. … 😉 Details.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Bienvenidos a Tijuana y México

Last week I went to Tijuana, Baja California, México, with the Pacific Photographic Society, a Meetup group that generates great photo trips, also having the benefit that it is also full of friends.It was the first time I had been south of the border in many years, only because I had no specific need, or an opportunity to visit with friends that also wanted to go. What a hoot! The organizer of the group is my friend, and a fellow photographer, Walter Koenig. Thanks Walter.

Now, onto the trip. Here in San Diego we are bombarded with so many negative stereotypes, and visions, of our neighbors just across the border that, when I mentioned to my nextdoor neighbor that I was heading south with a group, he said, “Don’t go.” We did not listen to the voices of preprogrammed fear. … We went, and we had a good time.

This is a link to my complete gallery of images from our Tijuana excursion.

Louie Navaro, of George’s Camera, was our guide for the trip. Louie also has a gallery he shares with two other photographers in Tijuana.

We walked across the border, and then met up with the van on the other side. First, we drove over to the Playas de Tijuana, where we shot some photos of the border, where it enters the ocean, and along the beach, and boardwalk. I met a young fighter, Ramon Barboza, El Moncho! … It was a very cool day at the beach.

Later, I got separated from the group after we had wandered around for a little while in the downtown area of Tijuana, and Ave. Revolución. … I asked a few folks which way to San Diego, on foot, and they pointed me in the right direction. It was a pleasant walk, but damn! When I got to the border, the pedestrian line was over two hours long. Holy Mackerel, what a nightmare!

Luckily for me, the rest of my group came wandering by while I was in line. They pulled me out, and we all took an eleven passenger van up to the border, where we used the bus line border transit, and that only took an hour and a few minutes!

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Petroglyph Painted Rock Sunset

The desert is an amazing place when it is still. When it is still, you can peer through the mists of time.

This is a very specific example of time travel. Here, at these very rocks, for millennia congregated Native Americans. In ancient times, it was the place to be. People sat here, and talked, smoked, exchanged goods, maybe they even made political alinements, weddings. … We can never be really sure what happened here generally.

But, we can be one hundred percent positive that man gathered here, and they wrote on the rocks.

Our archeologists, and scientists, have analyzed the symbols, and decided that they stand for many things. … But, what those symbols really stood for in the minds of the people who spent their time at the rocks, etching the symbols that have stood in this desert for a very long time, That we have no way of knowing.

One other thing we can know. … We can know the majesty of a sunset at these rocks, especially when you share that time with friends.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

A San Diego Day

What a day we had today! It was a great day to go for a walk. Make sure you check out the LEFT, Middle, and Right links for a better view.

This image is very large. It is made from 17 vertical images, and the full resolution is 42 thousand pixels wide, and 5,200 pixels tall. … It is so large that it cannot be easily displayed. … So I cut it into three pieces, and I have linked to those three parts to give you a better idea of what can be seen.
LEFTMiddleRIGHT

In the left piece, you can easily see Mount Laguna with yesterdays snow upon its flanks.
In the middle piece, you can see Iron Mountain in the left of the frame, and in the right of this frame, you can see the rocky face of El Capitan.
And, in the right piece, you can see Cowels Mountain.

In all three frames, you can see the kind of day we had today.

Today was just beautiful.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –