Thinking of Christine


Copyright-JackFosterMancilla


Thinking of Christine

by Jack Foster Mancilla
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I love prints. They are so expressive, and if you install an image on your wall, it becomes more than the print. It becomes a conversation with the with yourself, as your mood changes the image changes. One day it can talk with you about your pains, another day it will lift your spirits. Prints are a wonderful way to see an ever changing moment of life.

Frames can focus your mind on the print by eliminating the visual chatter that fils our world. Focus is a good thing.

I do know the world has moved to online images, almost exclusively, but I do not really care.

Prints are the bomb!

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Periscope – Jeremy Cowart – Majesty360

Jeremy Cowart walks around NYC and meets Majesty360

Photographer, Jeremy Cowart, was in New York for a gig. He is a great photographer. But Street Photography is not his normal type of photography. …
This evening he was trying Street Photography, and using Periscope. You can watch him as he learns how to approach people on the street. All the while he is teaching us about some other aspects of photography.

Jeremy Cowart Facebook https://www.facebook.com/jeremycowart?fref=ts
@jeremycowart Twitter

Majesty360 Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Majesty360
@Majesty360 Twitter

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Awaiting the Sun.

In the still times of the early mornings, before the sun rises, before the birds sing, there is a quiet time where we can contemplate our place in the world. What are our personal goals? What is the future of mankind in fifty years? A thousand years? Five thousand years? Longer than recorded history?

These times are but a drop in the bucket.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Zen at the Setting of the Sun

Everything that exists is its own complete universe. …
I stand by the sea, clicking away with my shutter release, grabbing the moments of a local sunset. Grabbing the fleeting moments as the sun hides behind the limb of the earth.
I stand with Gypsy, my dog who also enjoys the last few rays of this day. This day, when the sun, and the earth, and Gypsy, and I, all exists simultaneously.
This little moment, a few eye blinks between the Big Bang, and the final collapse of this universe, we share, almost entirely, the entirety of everything.

Everyone is the center of their own universe. … We are all equidistant from our centers, in all directions, at the speed of expansion, our individual observable universes, as they recede in an ever growing bubble of space time. Because we are all in different locations, and the speed of light is finite, all our observable universes are slightly out of sync.

Our universes overlap in every point except at the edges of the universe. Our edges are either, slightly closer or slightly farther away, from each of us, depending which edge we are closer to, by the distance that light takes to travle between us.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

A thing about Panoramas

This is just a little piece of information about why I shoot multi image panoramas. …I could shoot this with a single image using a very wide angle lens, or I could use a longer lens and take multiple images, and then stitch them together.

The secret is in the detail. … I believe everyone who reads this is a great photographer, or is smart enough to know the little things I know already. …

Detail. … The source image is a stitched set of ten images, five images per horizontal row. I shoot with a Canon 5D Mark II, whose RAW image width is about 5,600 pixels. … This combined RAW image has a width of 20,000 pixels, and a height of about 9,000 pixels. … In little words, “This image is way big.” That is what the image call-out is showing at the bottom of the image. Detail. … A little detail of the center of the combined image. If I had used a single wide angle image, my source would be only 5,600 pixels wide, not near as much detail in 5,600 pixels as 20,000 pixels.

I like stitched multi-image panoramas because they can maintain the beauty of a great space, as seen from a distance, and simultaneously, you can get close and see all kinds of interesting stories in the same image. … 😉 Details.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Bienvenidos a Tijuana y México

Last week I went to Tijuana, Baja California, México, with the Pacific Photographic Society, a Meetup group that generates great photo trips, also having the benefit that it is also full of friends.It was the first time I had been south of the border in many years, only because I had no specific need, or an opportunity to visit with friends that also wanted to go. What a hoot! The organizer of the group is my friend, and a fellow photographer, Walter Koenig. Thanks Walter.

Now, onto the trip. Here in San Diego we are bombarded with so many negative stereotypes, and visions, of our neighbors just across the border that, when I mentioned to my nextdoor neighbor that I was heading south with a group, he said, “Don’t go.” We did not listen to the voices of preprogrammed fear. … We went, and we had a good time.

This is a link to my complete gallery of images from our Tijuana excursion.

Louie Navaro, of George’s Camera, was our guide for the trip. Louie also has a gallery he shares with two other photographers in Tijuana.

We walked across the border, and then met up with the van on the other side. First, we drove over to the Playas de Tijuana, where we shot some photos of the border, where it enters the ocean, and along the beach, and boardwalk. I met a young fighter, Ramon Barboza, El Moncho! … It was a very cool day at the beach.

Later, I got separated from the group after we had wandered around for a little while in the downtown area of Tijuana, and Ave. Revolución. … I asked a few folks which way to San Diego, on foot, and they pointed me in the right direction. It was a pleasant walk, but damn! When I got to the border, the pedestrian line was over two hours long. Holy Mackerel, what a nightmare!

Luckily for me, the rest of my group came wandering by while I was in line. They pulled me out, and we all took an eleven passenger van up to the border, where we used the bus line border transit, and that only took an hour and a few minutes!

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Sweet Perspiration

One evening, in San Diego, there was an art reception for Walter Redondo at Meze, in the Gaslamp District.. Part of the evenings entertainment included a Belly Dancing group.

I just love the way this dancer stands, with her hair clinging to the perspiration on her beautiful neck. To me, this image is of a very powerful, and proud, woman who is working her body and loving her life.

It looks incredibly hot!
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