I found this little animal this morning.

The other day, I mentioned that Macros were everywhere. And I used a piece of moss that I cut out of the planter that the Plumeria was in, in the back yard.

Well. … I placed that moss in a little plastic container, and added water. “Why?” You ask. Well, I do not really know. … I like Moss. I was hoping to see it get really green. I just like all life and did not want t throw it away. … I would put it back where I got it, but I had not done that yet. …

So, as Gomer Pyle would say, “Surprise. Surprise.” When I looked, this morning there was a little hairy surprise in the moss. … So I shot this image. … When you look at the moth under normal light, it is much closer to the color of the moist ground around the moss. It is only because of the reflectivity of the moth, and the transparency of the water on the surrounding dirt/moss combination that channels the light away from the camera, that the moth stands out so brightly in this image.

Anyway. … The serendipity of unforseen consequences oftentimes adds an opportunity. … Take advantage of the opportunities.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Tiny little Moss Heads

I received a very fine complement on one of my flower macros. Actually, the complement used one macro image to refer to the quality of almost all my flower images. Thank you Vern. … Vern’s Link.

Back to today. 😉

After thinking about my response to his complement where I said something like, “Flowers are all over the place. You do not have to drive anywhere, and waste gas, nor are there other hidden costs for keeping your photo practice up-to-date.” … Or something like that.

I thought I might illustrate that statement. So I did. … That little image, of the tiny moss heads, was shot a couple hours ago. … The moss is from a potted plant in the back yard. The little instructional image following, also includes some extra information. … 🙂 Ok, not much extra information, but it does show how I got the background.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Small flower in soft light

I love walking around with a Macro lens. Getting up close and personal with the small things I see in my world.

When you look through the viewfinder of any image that you are shooting, you decide some things, like what you want to include in the frame. A Macro, because it is looking at such a small thing has already eliminated 99.9% of the world around you. You have chosen to focus on the tiny bit of the world that has captured your attention. Now what?

One of the very cool things about a Macro lens, that all photographers know, but that many people who take pictures do not know, is that a Macro has an incredibly narrow depth of field. Depth of field is the photographic term for the range of acceptable focus where the images seems to be sharp, or is sharp enough to be called, “in focus.”

Any lens has a specific focus. Period. But, our eyes cannot tell the difference between super sharp focus, and really good focus, or even just good focus. …

Depth of Field Indicators

Sometimes we get a little help from the lens manufacturers. You will notice the difference on these two len’s barrels. …

The top one is an 85 mm portrait lens, and the indicators are, in green feet, and in white meters, and the list at the bottom is the f-stop of acceptable focus. … You can see that in the 85 mm lens, at f16, is about 7 feet to 13 feet from the focal plane of the camera.

While the acceptable range of focus on the 180 mm Macro, focused for a 1to1 macro is so tine as to be indiscernible, just looking at the lens.

So, in any photo you also can limit what is in the frame with acceptable focus. That focus limitation, or strength, depending on your application, is exaggerated when shooting a Macro.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Unexpected Roses.

We all know that we are pretty good at whatever we do as a chosen craft, work, something we enjoy doing. And, we have come to expect the occasional rose from friends. The old Atta-boy, pat-on-the-back, kinds of roses that make us feel good. Then there are the special roses that come from nowhere you thought of.

Several times a day, almost every day, I go out front with my nextdoor neighbor. We are out there in the morning, drinking coffee, shooting the shit, letting Gypsy run around. Other neighbors walk by, two mothers pushing the quad-kid stroller on their power walks; people out getting their exercise; the Asian couple that keeps the old custom of her walking behind him. … I don’t get that one, but they are happy. … And, many people from the greater neighborhood walking their dogs.

I always ask whether Gypsy and their dogs can say, “Hi.” … Dogs like to say hello to their friends too.

One of the walkers of dogs, a man who stops and lets the dogs play, and spends time chatting with us, was driving by yesterday.

Yesterday, as he was driving by, he stopped, and made a point out of telling me, out of the blue, that he had accidentally found my blog, this blog, online. And he was totally surprised at the works contained here. And, that he was now a fan! …

Now that was an unexpected rose.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Jimson Weed – Hidden Things

Sometimes things are hidden.

San Diego has many beautiful areas in which one can play with a camera. Some of the places are hidden, like under the trees in Tecolote Canyon. Some of them are out in the open, for all to see, like Fiesta Island.

Fiesta Island is in the middle of Mission Bay. People play Over-The-Line there. They go water-skiing, kayaking, watch the Thunder Boats, walk their dogs. People do all kinds of things there.

Mostly people do those things on the edges of Fiesta Island, next to the water. After all, is that not why you go to an island in Mission Bay, to play on a beach, and in the water?

But on the interior of the island, things are quite different. Here is a link to a bunch of images on Fiesta Island. Most of these images have nothing to do with the water.

And then, we have the image of the Jimson Weed. It was hidden under the yellow flowers, on the little-traveled interior of Fiesta Island.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Macros – A whole Bunch of ’em!

Snail on Spider SilkCrystalline Ice Plant_MG_5324_MG_5323Crab Spider_MG_5309
Small ButterflySmall ButterflyReflections in a Lady BugDead GrassCrystalline Ice Plant_MG_3696
_MG_3694_MG_3691_MG_3684_MG_3075_MG_0217_MG_6863
_MG_6625-_MG_6618-_MG_5062_MG_7700_MG_7698_MG_7695

Macros, a set on Flickr.

My Macro Gallery on SmugMug
[by Jack Foster Mancilla]

I have been blown away by the ease of publishing images, and sets of images from Flickr to my Weblog. It is dead simple easy! And, I like it. 🙂

So I was perusing my sets of images, and I liked this set of Macros. They run the gamut over several years, including Snakes, Flowers, Insects, Snails. … Pretty much, anything I pointed my Macro lens at.

Enjoy the set. …

Jack

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

California Lupin – Lupinus albifrons

Some of the first, easily noticed, spring flowers are the Silver Lupins that pop up. … They are mostly noticeable because they are purple/blue, and stand out from the normally dusty colors of Southern California.

This plant jumped up on a firebreak along Tecolote Canyon after our most recent rain.

Lupinus albifrons, Silver lupine, white-leaf bush lupine, or evergreen lupine, is a species of lupine (lupin). It is native to California and Oregon, where it grows along the coast and in dry and open meadows, prairies, and forest clearings. It is a member of several plant communities, including coastal sage scrub, chaparral, northern coastal scrub, foothill woodland, and yellow pine forest.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

A Thousand Cactus Flowers

O.K. It is not really a thousand flowers. … But, as soon as I saw this cactus, and got close enough to see that it was flowers all across the crown, I thought, “Holy smokes! That’s a thousand flowers.” … 😉 No, really, I thought that.

But it is beautiful. …

One thing about Macros that bugs many people is the narrow depth of field when you are so close to the subject. … One way to fix that is to shoot many images and pick the focused part of each image and then blend them together. … This image is not really a single image. This image is made from thirty images of differing focus points. …

Pretty cool!

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Hibiscus in the Morning

Happy Thanksgiving. I am happy for many fine friends and fine things.

This is a morning Hibiscus flower in the back yard.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Under The Eaves – Wasp Nest

We noticed this nest, just under the eaves on the front of the house. It must have been there for a while, and not really bothered anyone, but now we know, they are there, waiting to pounce on the unsuspecting, child, dog, or even the gardener.

If you look closely during the video, you can see some easily observable actions that these wasps do as part of their social life. At the top center of the nest is a wasp that is going along the sides of a single paper cell, enlarging the cell with a paper mâché from its mouth. Below center, you can see two wasps grooming each other. Just above center right, you can see a whole line of larva whose faces look like the caterpillar in “A Bugs Life.” And if you watch very closely, you can see a wasp doing the wasp version of the wiggle dance.

★★★ View HD Video on YouTube ★★★

You should watch the video on YouTube. When you watch, make sure you see it in HD, and then expand the video to fit your screen.

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