A Small Field Mouse _DSC6358-.jpg July 25, 2017 at 01:36PM

The country mouse moved to Fiesta Island, and was taken aback by the plethora of tasty little things, until he got caught in a small flowering plant by my giant all seeing eye. … Then he froze for several blinks of an eye, and I was free for several seconds to chase this image.

See it here: http://ift.tt/2tAMVkn

Chrysalis June 12, 2017 at 12:31PM

So, As this was a discovered chrysalis, and I am not a lepidopterist, I cannot properly identify this as the chrysalis of any specific type. …

That little ball of spiky stuff is the remains of the caterpillar skin. I will watch this and see if the adult ever emerges. With luck, I may catch some action in a little while.

See it here: http://flic.kr/p/VtReyb

I found this little animal this morning.

The other day, I mentioned that Macros were everywhere. And I used a piece of moss that I cut out of the planter that the Plumeria was in, in the back yard.

Well. … I placed that moss in a little plastic container, and added water. “Why?” You ask. Well, I do not really know. … I like Moss. I was hoping to see it get really green. I just like all life and did not want t throw it away. … I would put it back where I got it, but I had not done that yet. …

So, as Gomer Pyle would say, “Surprise. Surprise.” When I looked, this morning there was a little hairy surprise in the moss. … So I shot this image. … When you look at the moth under normal light, it is much closer to the color of the moist ground around the moss. It is only because of the reflectivity of the moth, and the transparency of the water on the surrounding dirt/moss combination that channels the light away from the camera, that the moth stands out so brightly in this image.

Anyway. … The serendipity of unforseen consequences oftentimes adds an opportunity. … Take advantage of the opportunities.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Down by the Bay

Some days require keeping your nose to the grindstone, working your bottom off, and a couple pots of coffee to keep the pups primed.

This is the opposite of that kind of day. The kids are in school, most of the tourists are between here and there. It is a day of reflection, listening to the birds by the bay, the gentle lapping of the wavelets against the pilings. … Tomorrow is another day, but today, I am comfortable.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Being Cleaned – Pacific California Sheepshead

Pimelometopon pulchrum: The California sheepshead ranges from Monterey Bay to the Gulf of California with the largest populations in the lower half of the range, south of Point Conception. It is usually caught at the edges of kelp beds and rocky shores where its main diet consists of mollusks, lobsters, crabs, and small fishes. It is not related to the sheepshead of the Atlantic coast and the Gulf of Mexico. And, even more important, it is mightily tasty!

Link to more information on the California Sheepshead.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Spectral Web – Cone of Refraction

In this study of a Garden Spider’s web in the evening sun, I love the way the web refracts the sunlight. Look at that little cone of colors, to the right of the spider, it is a soft focused part of the web, but the way the light is caught on the tiny droplets of the web. The tiny drops are the sticky trap part of the web.

This image is beautiful in its small version, but at twenty inches by thirty inches, it is an eye catching jewel.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –

Under The Eaves – Wasp Nest

We noticed this nest, just under the eaves on the front of the house. It must have been there for a while, and not really bothered anyone, but now we know, they are there, waiting to pounce on the unsuspecting, child, dog, or even the gardener.

If you look closely during the video, you can see some easily observable actions that these wasps do as part of their social life. At the top center of the nest is a wasp that is going along the sides of a single paper cell, enlarging the cell with a paper mâché from its mouth. Below center, you can see two wasps grooming each other. Just above center right, you can see a whole line of larva whose faces look like the caterpillar in “A Bugs Life.” And if you watch very closely, you can see a wasp doing the wasp version of the wiggle dance.

★★★ View HD Video on YouTube ★★★

You should watch the video on YouTube. When you watch, make sure you see it in HD, and then expand the video to fit your screen.

Jack Foster Mancilla – LensLord™ – Home –